Memorize the GMAT Data Sufficiency Answer Choices

by Mark Wong on May 30, 2010 · 2 comments

in GMAT

Below is an excerpt of the directions for the GMAT’s data sufficiency questions.  Since the test is designed to press you for time, memorizing these answer choices is a quick win to save valuable minutes.  A couple things to note:

  • Make sure to evaluate 1, 2, and 3 all SEPARATELY.  Think of them as three different questions to ensure you don’t make a mistake.
  • If both 1 and 2 are TRUE, then 3 cannot be, so the answer is 4.
  • If choices 1, 2, and 3 are all NOT TRUE, then the answer is 5.

Directions

This data sufficiency problem consists of a question and two statements, labeled (1) and (2), in which certain data are given.  You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the question.  Using the data given in the statements, plus your knowledge of mathematics and everyday facts (such as the number of days in July or the meaning of the word counterclockwise), you must indicate whether:

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

  3. BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.

  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.

  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed.

Numbers

All numbers used are real numbers.

Figures

A figure accompanying a data sufficiency question will conform to the information given in the question but will not necessarily conform to the additional information given in statements (1) and (2).

Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight and lines that appear jagged can also be assumed to be straight.

You may assume that the positions of points, angles, regions, etc. exist in the order shown and that angle measures are greater than zero.

All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

Note: In data sufficiency problems that ask for the value of a quantity, the data given in the statement are sufficient only when it is possible to determine exactly one numerical value for the quantity.

Instructions provided by:  MBA.com

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

aliceNo Gravatar March 14, 2013 at 4:11 am

Good post about GMAT it is very useful for students

Idoko EneNo Gravatar June 28, 2016 at 3:27 pm

Good Post. I’m now informed on How to answer Data Sufficiency Questions

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